When Is knee pain an emergency?

When should you go to the ER for knee pain?

When to Go to the Hospital for Knee Pain

If you cannot put weight on your knee, feel sick, or have a fever or if your knee is red and hot, you should consider going to the ER to be evaluated by a doctor because of the possibility of a fracture or infection.

How do I know if my knee pain is serious?

Call your doctor if you:

  1. Can’t bear weight on your knee or feel as if your knee is unstable or gives out.
  2. Have marked knee swelling.
  3. Are unable to fully extend or flex your knee.
  4. See an obvious deformity in your leg or knee.
  5. Have a fever, in addition to redness, pain and swelling in your knee.

How much pain should you have before going to the hospital?

Pain is said to be at level 9 when it is excruciating, prevents you speaking and may even make you moan or cry out. Level 10 pain is unbearable. You will be bedridden and possibly even delirious.

When should you not ignore knee pain?

A snapping, cracking, or popping sound in the knee when there is also pain and swelling is not normal. Ignoring letting it go can cause permanent damage to the knee. A sharp pain and a painful pop could mean an ACL tear, so attention from a doctor is necessary.

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How long should knee pain last?

Simple strains or sprains can last for one to two weeks. More extensive injuries requiring arthroscopic surgery may take one to three months to heal. Major traumatic injuries to the knee may take up to a year to heal.

How do you check yourself for a torn meniscus?

Self tests for a meniscus tear

  1. Stand on your affected leg.
  2. Bend it slightly.
  3. Twist your body away from your leg.
  4. Twist your body toward the leg.
  5. Pain on torsion away from the leg may indicate a medial meniscus injury – the inside meniscus.

What symptoms will get you admitted to the hospital?

Going to the Hospital

  • Chest pain.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Palpitations (rapid heartbeat)
  • Weakness or dizziness.
  • Heavy bleeding.
  • Confusion or loss of consciousness.
  • Trauma, unless minor.
  • Moderate to severe pain.