Your question: What information does 911 need?

What information do you need to know when calling 911?

Know your location

The most important piece of information we need when someone calls 911 is the address of the emergency. Addresses come in many forms including a proper street address, but emergencies might not be at a physical address or you might not know the address.

What information should you give the 911 operator?

An emergency call taker or dispatcher will ask for your phone number and location and will ask other questions to determine whether you need police, fire or medical assistance. You should not hang up before the call taker does.

Do you have to give your information when calling 911?

The call-taker is always required to ask the caller’s name and phone number. This is in case we have to call you back, or the responders need to talk to someone who actually saw what happened. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO GIVE YOUR NAME. Your call will be handled the same regardless if you choose not to identify yourself.

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What are 5 things you need to be sure you tell a 911 dispatcher when calling about an emergency?

5 Things You Should Do When You Call 911

  • Check the scene. Your own safety is the first thing to consider. …
  • Give your location. Your location is one of the two most important details you need to give the dispatcher, Captain Bender tells us. …
  • Give as much medical information as you can. …
  • Listen to the dispatcher.

What 3 pieces of information do you need when calling 9-1-1?

When calling 9-1-1 your child needs to know their name, parent’s name, telephone number, and most importantly their address. Tell them to answer all the call takers questions and to stay on the phone until instructed to hang up.

What are 3 questions you should be prepared to answer when calling 9-1-1?

Questions

  • Person’s problem or the type of incident (“Tell me exactly what happened?”).
  • Approximate age.
  • Is he or she conscious?
  • Is he or she breathing?
  • EXACTLY what the dispatcher asks you to do. Emergency service professionals are.

What is the most critical information to give a 911 dispatcher?

Dispatchers ask for pertinent information first – address, type of call, name of caller or those involved, and your call back number. Once the initial information is obtained, additional questions may be asked depending on the type of call.

What information you will need to provide to a responder?

Helpful basic information to provide include whether the victims are breathing, pulse present and any significant bleeding or other life-threatening injuries.

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What information should you provide when calling for help?

The important things to remember when calling for help are:

  • Which service do you need – Fire, Ambulance or Police.
  • Your name and phone number.
  • Where are you? …
  • What happened, for example there has been a car accident.
  • How many people have been injured and what injuries do they have.

Can you find out who called 911?

A: Records of 911 calls are public records under the California Public Records Act and, therefore, must be disclosed unless a specific exemption to disclosure applies. … When applicable, this exemption permits police and other agencies to withhold investigatory files from the public, even after the investigation is over.

What should you not call 911?

An emergency is any serious medical problem (chest pain, seizure, bleeding), any type of fire (business, car, building), any life-threatening situation (fights, person with weapons, etc.) or to report crimes in progress. Do not dial 911 for a non-emergency.

What happens if you call 911 and don’t say anything?

But what happens if a 911 dispatcher hears nothing but silence? … Still, because some silent calls are true emergencies, 911 dispatchers are trained to follow silent call protocols. That means immediately sending a police officer to the call location—if the caller used a landline.